Dependency on Fossil Fuel – Why the Auto Industry is Kicking the Addiction to Oil

The worldwide auto industry loves fossil fuel. It has been addicted to oil since the first Model T rolled off of the assembly line. The internal combustion energy thrives on fossil fuel – gasoline, diesel.

But there’s a problem. The main suppliers of oil to feed the auto industry’s addiction keeps raising the price, and the supplies of oil are being depleted. There IS a bottom; an end. The world will eventually run out of oil.

Of course, we can’t put all of the world’s oil consumption habit on the shoulders of just the automobile industry. If every automobile in the United States was a hybrid by the year 2025, we’d still be importing as much oil as we do today. We use a lot of oil, and we use it for all sorts of things.

The automobile industry is bearing the brunt of the responsibility and the industry IS responsible, but it isn’t totally responsible. Every single one of us use oil every time we turn on a light, use our blow dryer, or open a can of soup.

But cars are a large part of the problem, and the truth is that the industry is experimenting with alternative energy sources to power automobiles – and they have been for a lot of years now. There are a lot of possibilities.

Fuel made from plants is an option. So far a method of extracting and delivering biofuel hasn’t been perfected. Fuel cells are another possibility. The auto industry has been experimenting with fuel cells for more than 10 years. Fuel cells use hydrogen to generate electricity by creating a chemical reaction that releases energy that can be used to power a car or truck. The research is promising. The auto industry will kick the addiction to oil – not because it wants to but because it has no other choice.

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Source: http://www.articlecity.com/articles/environment_and_going_green/article_465.shtml